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Wednesday, April 19, 2006

8 comments:

Megan Moore said...

The blog looks great! I am very proud of you! This book offers a different perspective to the hip-hop generation and the role black men play. A wonderful look at black masculinity without dogging men out. Instead, this book offers a unique perspective supported by research, data and institutional knowledge. Hip hop and culture is being discussed outside of the beauty salon; making it's way onto elite college campuses. I can't wait for the book to debut. I must read for all generations!

paunice savage said...

..people can try to ignore hip hop and its culture if they want to..but it is a genre and lifestyle that speaks to the times we are living in... i look forward to Deconstructing Tyrone... congrats! ladies....

paunice savage said...

..people can try to ignore hip hop and its culture if they want to..but it is a genre and lifestyle that speaks to the times we are living in... i look forward to Deconstructing Tyrone... congrats! ladies....

Cocoa Girl said...

This is Hannah, writing under Rachel's handle. I'm so proud of you both! I know this was a labor of love, but a lot of labor all the same. I can't wait to read it!
Love and wishes for the NYT best-seller list!
Hannah

Cocoa Girl said...

Hi - This is Rachel writing under Rachel's handle (got dammit!). I just wanted to say congratulations Nat (and Nat - hi...we've never met).

I will definitely cop a copy in support of something great.
Love,
Rachel

mood indigo said...

Nice cover. Now I know exactly what to look for at Borders this fall. You know, it might make an interesting blog entry to write about how that cover came about. Much success.

kamau

Swamadan said...

Wow. NYM, what can I say? Speaking as a hip-hop male that has come of age, I question what this thing called "hip-hop" is these days. During my adolescence, it was about "Fight the Power", "My Philosophy", and "F**k Tha Police". I remember when Guru proudly announced, "I was raised like a Muslim, praying to the East...", I remember Pac eloquently telling us about a teenage girl named "Brenda". Those are the things that shaped my worldview. I've been spending time with middle schoolers lately...to hear a bunch of 12 year olds singing "Meet me at the club, it's going down" feels like someone is taking a cheese grater to my culture. And to make it worse, I somehow feel culpable. As a thirty-something hip-hop head/professional/father, I feel like it's time to take a stand. And I hope others in my demographic (men and women alike) read the book and feel the same way (NYM-the keeper of the culture concept, right?) Anyhoo, I hope this book can serve as a starting point. Looking forward to the full read!

paunice said...

.. natalie i knew you came from a long line of educated negros...your uncle sounds like he was a nice man! i miss him and i don't even know him... he reminds me of men in my family...and other strong intelligent black men holding it down for their families, students and anyone else who needs them.... r.i.p. DR.Uncle!